El rumor de las cosas / The Rumor of things (Spanish Edition)
El rumor de las cosas / The Rumor of things (Spanish Edition)
El rumor de las cosas / The Rumor of things (Spanish Edition)
by Linda Morales Caballero

The first section of this enigmatic book is entitled “Kintsugi,” translated by its author, Linda Morales Caballero, as “the beauty of scars.” And that it is; but it is something else as well. The Japanese word (金継ぎ), composed of kin (gold or golden) and tsugi (to repair) refers to the art of repairing or suturing broken objects: ceramic bowls, for example, with gold liquid. As each object breaks differently, the golden sutures take on a special beauty, and in the end what is on display, as the author rightly says, is “the beauty of the scars.”

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