Liliya Gazizova. An Unnecessary Line

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Liliya Gazizova, photo credit Masha Sivova
photo: Masha-Sivova
Liliya Gazizova. An Unnecessary Line

Лишняя строка

Уточнить отношения.
Выпить яду.
Составить план на завтра.
На вечерней разминке
Пробежать на шестьсот метров
Больше, чем вчера.
Вернуться утомлённой.
Принять душ.
Не удержаться
И съесть три конфеты
С барбарисовым вкусом.
Попереписываться о важном
С чудным человеком,
Живущим у моря.
Послушать испанскую песенку
На стихи, переведённые
Этим поэтом.
Заснуть раньше, чем обычно.
Проснуться посреди ночи
И попытаться вспомнить,
Что снилось.
Проснуться утром
С желанием описать
Вчерашний вечер.
Про яд строчка лишняя была.

 

An Unnecessary Line

To clarify the relationship.
To drink poison.
To make plans for tomorrow.
To run six hundred meters
more than yesterday
for an evening warm-up.
To come back tired.
To take a shower.
To be unable to refrain
from eating three candies
with barberry flavor.
To chat about something important
with a wonderful man
living by the sea.
To listen to a Spanish song
based on poems translated
by this man.
To fall asleep earlier than usual.
To wake up in the middle of the night
and to try to remember
what you dreamed about.
To wake up in the morning
with a desire to describe
yesterday evening.
The line about poison was unnecessary.

Translated from Russian by Nina Kossman

About the Author:

Liliya-Gazizova-author
photo by Khalimenur Avshar
Liliya Gazizova
Kayseri, Turkey

Liliya Gazizova is a poet, essayist, and translator. Born in Kazan (Russia), she graduated from the Kazan Medical Institute as well as from the Moscow Literary Institute (1996). Her publications include fifteen collections of poems published in Russia, Europe and America. Her poems have been translated into many European languages and published in international anthologies. A recipient of several literary awards, she is the executive secretary of the New York-based international magazine Interpoezia as well as the organizer of LADOMIR, the International Khlebnikov Festival (Kazan – Elabuga). Currently, she teaches Russian literature at Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey.

Liliya Gazizova Лилия Газизова
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